What You Don't Know About Silicon Valley

What You Don't Know About Silicon Valley

Why you should care

Because what folks in Silicon Valley are doing today is very likely what you’ll be doing tomorrow.

The Pet Market Goes Boom

Pet ownership in the United States has tripled over the last 30 years, to 82 million households. And 91 percent of Americans who own pets view their kitties and puppies as equal members of the family, according to a 2012 Harris Poll. In the past, Americans have spent money on their pets mostly for staples like food, standard veterinary care and basic supplies. But this is changing. After all, your dog needs luxury. And companies and products — from the $100 Fetch battery-powered ball launcher to DogVacay, like an Airbnb for pets — are clamoring to fill that need. Think of it this way: For every marketplace, there’s pretty much a pet equivalent. Read the story here.

The Forgotten Silicon Valley Founders

The unsung hero is history’s most tragic creation. And Silicon Valley has produced them in abundance. The stories of these three founders — Marc Randolph of Netflix, Larry Sanger of Wikipedia and Noah Glass of Twitter — are most often footnotes to Wikipedia pages of the famous. Read the story here.

When you hear the term executive coach, your mind might not jump to an image of a yoga mat. However, if you’re in Silicon Valley, that might not be so far off. Executives turn to coaches for one-on-one training from an objective third party who can help them develop leadership skills within the context of their jobs. In addition to this, the concept of mindfulness is increasingly becoming integrated into Silicon Valley corporate life. With that twist comes a group of executive coaches from a very flexible group of candidates: yoga instructors. Read the story here.

Fantasy Valleyball

It’s fantasy sports for the startup game. With so much buzz about booming startups, IPOs and 25-year-old billionaires, Valleyball is the average person’s chance to tap into the Silicon Valley culture of high-tech and hot startups. There’s no real money at stake in this game, but for tech geeks and aspiring Zucks the world over, this might be the only real shot you’ve got at making it big time. And in some ways, it might be the best way to test whether or not you can make big bucks: if you can make money in the fantasy world you might be a good venture capitalist. Read it here.

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