OZY on Welcoming — and Celebrating — the Waters

OZY on Welcoming — and Celebrating — the Waters

Why you should care

Because water moves us in mysterious ways.

Wild Water Pics From a Daredevil

Imagine it was your job to wake up at 5 a.m. every morning, strap on a wetsuit, head down to a gorgeous Australian beach, dive into crystalline turquoise water and take pictures of your surroundings: waves, surfers and a 24-karat sunrise. Sound magical? For Eugene Tan, one of Australia’s most famous surf photographers, this is his reality. Tan’s addictive bursts of daily beauty — the fiery skies and glassy waves of Bondi Beach — will have you itching to drop everything and move to Australia.

Men Who Dance in the Water

These guys are the true mermen. A photographer shares his stunning images of The Paris Aquatique — an all-male synchronized swimming team — that capture their amazing strength, endurance and flexibility. Formed in 1998, the team is comprised of engineers, designers, computer techs, sports instructors, real estate agents and police officers. See the shots from May 18, 2013, taken at the Georges-Vallerey swimming pool, of what the photographer calls “four minutes of the aquatic version of a street fight.”

Floating: The New Facial

When’s the last time you stopped to hear yourself blink? Meet the float center, the latest in scheduled sensory deprivation (or, some say, enhancement). Floaters pay roughly $1 per minute to climb into a larger-than-human-size tank filled with 11 inches of 93.5-degree water mixed with 750 to 800 pounds of Epsom salts. Inside, “there’s nothing going on in there,” isolation tank builder Glen Perry explains. “Pretty soon the mental chatter subsides.” Eye blinks become audible. There is no sense of touch, because the water temperature is identical to your skin’s. It is so dark that you are often surprised to realize your eyes are open, not shut. Would you try it?

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OZYWildcard

Square pegs. Round holes.