Drinking the Improbable

Drinking the Improbable

Why you should care

Because from lands both far and wide bold beverages come. Drink deeply friends.

Drinking the Trees: Maple Water

Looking for a new nutrient-rich natural beverage — one that has half the sugar of coconut water and more manganese than a cup of kale? Look no further than the clear liquid brought to you by maple trees. It turns out that the maple’s watery sap is good for more than just making syrup for your waffles and pancakes. Drinking a glass of maple water might sound less than refreshing, and just a little bit gooey, but it turns out that’s not the case at all. Unlike coconut water, it’s more like regular water with a hint of sweetness, and has a lasting sweet aftertaste. Think of it as regular H2O with a hint of that familiar syrup flavor we all know and love. Good for you and tasty? We’re sold! Read the story here.

Camels: The New Milk Trend

Somalis love it, Saudis see it as the ultimate treat and the fanciest coffee shops in Dubai are raving about it. We’re talking about camel milk. From camels. The Bedouins’ drink of choice is now available in the U.S., thanks to a company that is selling and marketing it as a wholesome, nutrient-packed alternative to conventional cow’s milk. (Slogan: “Make everyday a hump day.”) While the product is a novelty for most Western countries — where it doesn’t come cheap — it has a long history in other corners of the world. And it’s nutritious, too, with half the fat of cow’s milk, three times the vitamin C and more. But what does it taste like? It depends on the local camel diet. Here’s what our OZY taste-taster had to say. Read the story here.

Smoke + Drink in the Same Glass?

Craving tobacco with your cocktail while in a bar that bans smoking? There’s a drink for that. Drinking and smoking go together like, well, like drinking and smoking. Stephanie Teslar, the mixologist and head bartender at cocktail bar Blue Hound in Phoenix, has devised a way to combine the joyfully painful burn of whiskey with the heady high of smoking a cigar. But without the cigar. A new trend in cocktails involves adding tobacco infusions to drinks, but Teslar has upped the stakes by making a cocktail that includes actual tobacco in the glass. Her drink, called “Lawless,” is a combination of whiskey, malört and homemade bitters – which involves using a torch to heat up vanilla pipe tobacco on a cast iron skillet. Thirsty? Read the story here.

Cloud Juice and Skywater

Richard Heinichen has an interesting job: He harvests rainwater. And he sells kits that let you capture and filter your own rainwater in something other than an old tire, with little filtering required. Used wisely, rain harvesting could be enough to give a small household a steady supply of water and a handhold on self-sufficiency. For those who either live in drought-stricken regions or are free from drought but lazy, there’s Richard’s Happy Water. Heinichen calls it “cloud juice,” and with no chemicals or additives, it’s purer and significantly less hard than most of the water we use to drink, cook and wash our clothes, he claims. With 780 million people worldwide drawing their water from unsafe sources, resulting in one child dying every 21 seconds from poor sanitation, and with a record U.S. drought straining water supplies for thirsty agricultural fields and city dwellers alike, it may be time to think of H2O as more than a calorie-free way to slake your thirst between yoga and the gym. Read the story here.

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