The Presidential Daily Brief

important

  1. Police crime scene tape shutterstock 107853224

    Twelve Officers Injured in Charlotte Police-Shooting Protest

    The cycle continues. Charlotte, North Carolina, police say Keith Lamont Scott was holding a firearm and posed an “imminent deadly threat” when Officer Brentley Vinson, who is also Black, shot and killed him. But witnesses say Scott was holding a book, not a gun. A crowd of about 100 gathered at the scene to protest police killings across the country, including Friday’s in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The protest was allegedly infiltrated by “agitators” who damaged police vehicles, and 12 officers were injured as police used tear gas to break up the crowd.

  2. manhattan bombing shutterstock 485062126

    Feds Charge Suspect in NY, NJ Bombings

    They believe he acted alone. Ahmad Khan Rahami, 28, has hit with federal charges today of use of a weapon of mass destruction, bombing, destruction of property and use of a destructive device. He was shot and apprehended after a widespread manhunt ended in a gun battle when police found him sleeping outside a New Jersey bar. Investigators are trying to determine how he learned to make the bombs they believe he set in Manhattan and New Jersey, whether he was directed by ISIS or another terrorist organization, and if he had any accomplices.

  3. Syria flag damaged by gunfire shutterstock 327353651

    White House: Russia to Blame for Strike on Aid Convoy in Syria

    Everyone’s pointing fingers. The White House says regardless of whether Russian or Syrian planes dropped the bombs, Russia is responsible for Monday’s attack on a United Nations aid convoy near Aleppo that killed 20 civilians and forced the U.N. to suspend deliveries of medical and other supplies. Russia, meanwhile, says there’s no evidence of an airstrike. Top Obama adviser Ben Rhodes said the U.S. hopes to continue the crumbling cease-fire deal, but the strike ”raises serious questions about whether or not this agreement moves forward.”

  4. Hillary Clinton serious Pennsylvania shutterstock 474570088

    Trump, Clinton Spar on National Security After Attacks

    Who will keep you safe? Hillary Clinton called Donald Trump a “recruiting sergeant for the terrorists” for his anti-Muslim rhetoric, while the GOP nominee defended his plan to profile Muslims and said Clinton’s support for the Iraq war helped lead to ISIS. Meanwhile, both candidates met with world leaders on the sidelines of a U.N. gathering yesterday. Polls show Americans trust Clinton slightly more on security — traditionally a Republican strength — but Trump backers are far more concerned about terrorism, and rising anxiety could benefit the mogul.

  5. theresa may shutterstock 415799044

    British Prime Minister Courts Wall Street on US Visit

    Who needs EU anyway? Several Eastern European countries have warned they might veto any post-Brexit U.K. deal that doesn’t include the right to free movement, a bloc membership perk that Theresa May’s been pressured by her party to end. Leaving the EU without a deal could be disastrous for Britain, and May’s sworn it won’t happen — but she’s also using her visit to New York’s U.N. meeting to woo back American banks and big firms with London branches that might be tempted to withdraw after Brexit.

  6. Skittlegate, the Political Heft of Pockets and President Cranky Pants

    Know This: The Muslim Brotherhood is trying to make a comeback after rebranding. Angela Merkel apologized to voters after her party saw historic losses in regional elections. And Donald Trump Jr. has drawn fire after comparing Syrian refugees to poisoned Skittles.

    Read This: Hillary Clinton’s pantsuits don’t have pockets. Here’s why that matters.

    Remember This Number: 1,900. That’s how many entities have registered to launch U.S. presidential campaigns this year — under names including God, Satan, Cranky Pants and One Cent Piece, a penny registered by a California teenager — since the Federal Elections Commission eased the initial process by putting forms online.

intriguing

  1. Brad pitt angelina jolie

    Angelina Jolie Files for Divorce From Brad Pitt

    Bye bye, Brangelina. The actors and parents of six are calling quits on their marriage of just two years, after more than a decade together. Jolie, a U.N. diplomat and lecturer at the London School of Economics, has reportedly filed the legal paperwork to dissolve the marriage. The pair have been tabloid favorites since co-starring in Mr. & Mrs. Smith — while Pitt was still married to actress Jennifer Aniston. Jolie is reportedly seeking physical custody of the children as speculation abounds over just what caused the split.

  2. h dean shutterstock 126462884

    How Howard Dean Reinvented Presidential Campaigns

    He remains young at heart. The 2004 Democratic hopeful — featured in tonight’s The Contenders: 16 for ‘16, airing at 8 p.m. EST on PBS — brought new life to grassroots insurgency on the campaign trail. Relying on what he calls “tons and tons of 23-year-olds,” Dean’s campaign embraced the power of the internet to rally young, progressive voters. The straight-talking, small-town doctor offered himself as the antidote to Washington’s slick ways — though he was ultimately shot down by momentum-derailing fire from the Washington establishment.

    Grassroots Support

    intriguing
    Sources:
  3. shutterstock 397511770

    Feds Issue Regulations for Self-Driving Cars

    Anthony Foxx, take the wheel. The U.S. secretary of transportation lays out new rules of the road today in an effort to create nationwide standards for the vehicles already circulating in autopilot projects from Mountain View, California, to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The federal government will license self-driving software based on 15 safety factors, giving states power over registration and liability, but supported by a national legislative framework that they hope will encourage adoption of self-driving technology while avoiding an “inconsistent patchwork” of local regulations.

  4. Mosquito

    Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Face Political Hurdles

    Can mutants save the world? The Aedes aegypti mosquito spreads notorious killers like yellow fever, Zika and dengue fever. But a British biotech company, Oxitec, has genetically modified male Aedes mosquitoes to pass on a lethal gene to females, which could potentially wipe out whole mosquito populations. Some in Zika-panicked Florida see the technology as a godsend, but a prime test site in the Florida Keys, which already has FDA approval, is awaiting a public vote as citizens weigh fears about potential future “superbugs” against the realities of Zika.

  5. charlize theron shutterstock 276232379

    ‘Mad Max’ Prequel Reportedly in Pre-Production

    They might be on the road again. After Mad Max: Fury Road became a surprise hit last year, picking up six Oscars and pulling in $378 million, speculation abounded over the franchise’s next chapter. Director George Miller said he’d do a smaller interim project before returning to the dystopian world of Max and Furiosa, but new Australian media reports indicate that the tentatively titled Mad Max: The Wasteland already has a New South Wales filming location, and that both Miller and Charlize Theron will return to explore Furiosa’s backstory.

  6. Philadelphia Eagles helmet NFL shutterstock 306052748

    Rookie QB Wentz Passes Road Test, Takes Eagles to 2-0

    He came, he conquered, he Wentz. Before a hostile Monday Night Football crowd in Chicago, Carson Wentz handled tough hits and kept the Eagles offense moving in a 29-14 victory. The No. 2 overall draft pick from lower-tier North Dakota State University was first tapped for third string, but has taken over with a mettle more impressive than his stats — including zero interceptions. A stifling defense and weak Bears and Browns teams helped, but a bigger test awaits: the undefeated Pittsburgh Steelers.