The Presidential Daily Brief

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  1. trump 17028185388 8b61cf9e1f k

    Donald Trump Rockets to Nevada Caucus Victory

    It wasn’t even close. The real estate mogul declared he’s “winning the country” after taking 45 percent of the vote in the casino-friendly state, his best showing yet. OZY’s national politics reporter Nick Fouriezos notes that the rout is particularly devastating to the ABT — “Anybody But Trump” — crowd. They’ve rallied around Marco Rubio, who’s still battling for second place. But the night and its record Republican turnout belonged to Trump, with just a week left before a Super Tuesday that could crown him the next GOP nominee for president.

  2. a tara air plane

    Nepal Mountain Plane Crash Kills 23

    There’s no hope. A Twin Otter plane operated by Tara Air crashed today near the village of Dana in Myagdi district, killing all 23 aboard. The plane crashed into a hillside, and was still in flames when the search team arrived. According to a 2015 analysis, the airline has one of the worst safety records in the industry, but the cause of the crash — which occurred halfway through the 20-minute flight from Pokhara to Jomsom — remains unclear. Crews are being sent to recover the bodies because helicopters cannot land near the scene.

  3. mitch mcconnell

    Senate GOP Refuses Hearings for Supreme Court Nominee

    This is unprecedented. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is urging President Obama to not even bother nominating a new justice to the nation’s highest court. A written vow from Senate Republicans on Tuesday promised that not only would they refuse to hold hearings, but they wouldn’t even meet with the nominee, a traditional courtesy. The White House accused the GOP of devastating partisanship, pointing out that no nominee since 1875 has been denied a vote, but the Senate is firm: The next president will fill the vacancy.

  4. oil refinery

    Saudi Oil Minister Refuses to Slow Production

    It’s a slick strategy. Ali al-Naimi told a gathering of energy companies and oil-producing countries that Saudi Arabia won’t be cutting back on production, despite the global glut and plummeting prices. The Saudis know that U.S. and Canadian oil production is more expensive, and they’re betting they can shoulder the North Americans out of the free-falling market, even if prices drop to $20 a barrel. The news itself dragged prices lower, to under $33, with analysts warning that lack of confidence in oil could trigger another recession.

  5. UN Makes First Aid Drop in Deir al-Zour, Blatter and Platini Lose Fifa Appeals 

    U.N. drops first delivery of aid into ISIS-besieged Syrian city. (BBC)

    Sepp Blatter, Michel Platini lose Fifa appeals, but bans trimmed to six years. (The Guardian)

    Tornadoes ravage Gulf Coast, killing at least 3. (ABC) 

    Judge orders Hillary Clinton’s staff to testify about emails. (FT) sub

    Aid begins to arrive on islands devastated by Cyclone Winston. (Reuters)

    Bolivian voters: President Evo Morales can’t run for fourth term. (AP)

    Egypt admits mistake in sentencing toddler to life in prison for murder. (CNN)

intriguing

  1. snickers 493014354 4371b016c0 o

    Snickers Manufacturer Recalls Candy Bars in 55 Countries

    These won’t satisfy. Chocolate maker Mars is recalling Milky Way, Snickers and Mars bars of all sizes across Europe and Asia. The U.S. isn’t affected, because it’s not supplied by the company’s Dutch factories — the ones being held responsible for a piece of red plastic a German customer found in a Snickers bar in January. Mars says the recall is voluntary and mostly a precautionary measure, but it’s warning customers against eating chocolates with best-before dates from June 2016 to January 2017.

  2. 14915654091 d6187708c8 o

    Are Indian Campuses Sparking a New Arab Spring?

    They’re not cutting off water supplies … Nevertheless, student protests are on the rise in India, fueled partly by young liberalism in the face of a new right-of-center government. But social media and demographics feed the fervor, too. Students from both sides of the aisle know something’s afoot, whether they call it “fake nationalism” or “lack of patriotism.” They’re chiming in on everything from support for convicted terrorists to the Delhi rape case, sparking fiery debates, occasional violence and, these days, even suicides, arrests, and terrorism.

  3. mosquito bite

    CDC Eyes Sexually Transmitted Zika Infections

    This isn’t the love bug. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 14 new U.S. cases of the Zika virus, including several pregnant women, may have been contracted sexually. All of the new cases are women — the CDC has no evidence that females can transmit the virus to partners — and they may help researchers determine how long Zika remains in semen. For now, the CDC isn’t asking men to get tested, but encouraging people to use condoms or abstain from sex if they’ve traveled to an infected area.

  4. audience

    Study: Hollywood Diversity Good for Business

    It’s a wise investment. Just days after a similar study found Hollywood fails to provide equal representation across race and gender, a new UCLA analysis found movies and shows with multiracial casts also make more money. Study author Dr. Darnell Hunt said audiences increasingly “crave diverse content,” pointing to the fact that 60 percent of tickets for 2014’s most financially successful film, Transformers: Age of Extinction, were bought by minority audiences. Hunt says if Hollywood can’t be moved for altruistic reasons, maybe it can be ushered forward by the bottom line.

  5. kyrie irving

    Bed Bugs Kept Kyrie Irving Out of Game

    He couldn’t stomach it. Irving missed most of the Cavaliers’ Sunday win over the Thunder with flu-like symptoms — but the 23-year-old guard later revealed the cause was actually bed bug bites. The historic Skirvin Hilton Hotel in Oklahoma City, which already has a reputation for being haunted, has apologized and said an investigation revealed it was an isolated incident. Irving has since returned to action, but he may join a growing list of NBA players that seek alternative lodging options when they visit.