The Week Ahead: Cuban Dreams, the Hacker Threat and a Special Series

The Week Ahead: Cuban Dreams, the Hacker Threat and a Special Series

Why you should care

Because you might need an antidote for the Sunday blues.

CUBA BOUND

The First Family heads to Havana tonight, making Barack Obama the first U.S. president to visit since Calvin Coolidge did, almost 90 years ago. The Obamas, we suspect, will have a lot more fun than Silent Cal allowed himself. The trip is a kind of capstone to a U.S.–Cuba normalization process that started more than a year ago, with a signal that they’d begin to end the Cold War–era embargo.

The president will be meeting with dissidents but, according to the White House, will stress in an address to the Cuban people that the United States is no longer seeking regime change. Also on the docket: a baseball game.

THE WEEK OF HILLARY

“There’s covering the news, and then there’s a point where you cross over into enabling a racist who has espoused fascist views on the stump.” So went a missive from an irate reader this month; she was upset by our five-part series on Donald J. Trump. Though we disagree that we’d “crossed over” into Trump tooldom, the reader tapped into an important debate, one that will continue to roil for months: Where is the line between informing and enabling?

For what it’s worth, we’re spilling plenty of pixels on his probable White House rival, Hillary Clinton, this week. Look today for Sean Braswell’s piece on Clinton’s entrée into the national spotlight a quarter-century ago, along with reminiscences about chocolate chip cookies and country music stars. Later in the week, we’ll analyze GOP strategy against her, look at one of Clinton’s wunderkind organizers, Marlon Marshall, and consider what Clinton’s Haiti record tells us.

TALES FROM THE ENCRYPT

Tomorrow, we’ll drive over to Cupertino, California, to watch Apple’s first big rollout of the year; it’s anticipated that the company will launch a new four-inch iPhone and a new iPad too. It’s unclear whether CEO Tim Cook will say anything about Apple’s ongoing fight with the FBI over encryption and privacy.

Meanwhile, though, questions about privacy and security are ramping up as we live more and more of our lives digitally: our phones, our credit cards and now … our drones? A fascinating piece, to be published tomorrow, looks at why drones could be the next big hacker threat. As the use of drones expands — one trade group estimates their domestic impact will reach $82 billion by 2025 — the threat of breach is expected to escalate. Those breaches could expose personal information ranging from an individual’s whereabouts and actions to private conversations and emails exchanged on a cell phone.

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