The Aftermath VI: Has Trump Opened the Door for a New Type of Candidate?

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Why you should care

Because we may have just witnessed the extinction of the “traditional” political candidate.

Part 6 of The Aftermath with Christina Greer, a provocative OZY original series featuring candid conversations between Black thought leaders who are coming to terms with what a Trump presidency could mean for the communities they represent.

President Winfrey? President Clooney? It’s not as crazy as you may think. One thing the election of Donald Trump has shown is that the old model of who’s “electable” no longer applies. Democratic fundraiser Mark Smith believes 2016 revealed that the days of building a political career one block at a time, going from local to state to national politics before being deemed suitable to consider the highest office in the land, are over. Or the reality-show-created dawn of a time when name recognition outweighs government experience. Or when corporate acumen (ahem) trumps political know-how. And he’s OK with that.

On November 9, President Obama promised those reeling from Donald J. Trump’s election stunner that “the sun will still rise in the morning.” Ten weeks later, on the eve of Trump’s inauguration, the sun continues to rise — and OZY is pleased to bring forth stories, conversations and viewpoints from across the political spectrum.

Next week, we’ll kick off a yearlong series that will bring you political reporting from every state in the nation. We will continue to showcase conservative and liberal thought leaders, like Paul Ryan, Karl Rove and Al Franken. This week, we are pleased to present this seven-part, video op-ed series featuring political scientist Christina Greer. The focus? How African-Americans are dealing with the aftermath of the 2016 election.

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