Should Big Tech Share Your Data? We Asked, You Answered

Should Big Tech Share Your Data? We Asked, You Answered

Why you should care

Because this is how folks feel about data security versus privacy.

Last week we asked, “Should tech companies give up your data automatically to the FBI? Why or why not?” You responded. Here are some reader perspectives, edited for clarity. Check back tomorrow for our next question. Every Wednesday, we’re shelving the PC to discuss provocative topics in the lead-up to our next TV show, Third Rail with OZY, launching on PBS this fall. Stay tuned.

William Hathaway

Not just NO, but HELL NO. We have a Bill of Rights and judges to back it up. If the goons cannot get permission from a duly installed judge, then they have no excuse to pry. Keep their paws out of our pants, our homes, our privacy.

Sarah Zitin

This kind of surveillance must be very, very selective, and not on the entire population of very innocent, innocuous people. It’s appropriate where there is enough information about terrorism or foul play — not as an attack on our rights or the Constitution.

Peter VandeVort

We live in a society where, in the judicial system, people are considered innocent until proven guilty. The government needs warrants to invade a person’s privacy. As seen by numerous Supreme Court cases, they must be very careful not to overstep that warrant, and need an additional warrant if there is potentially other illegal activity that is not in plain view. By tracking people’s internet history, something that is obviously not in plain view, this is a clear breach of the Fourth Amendment and therefore should not be allowed.

Paula Harrington

Seems like “they” ought to have a warrant to find out how wonderful I am.

Linda Newcomb

If you want them to be bored to death … who cares, really?

Jon Lisle-Summers

What makes you think it doesn’t happen already? Evidence so far, Snowden et al., suggests we won’t find out unless there’s a whistle-blower.

Kim Cady

No. While I can understand the concept of monitoring what people read/look at/say on the Internet from a security standpoint, it is a basic invasion of privacy. As Ben Franklin once said, “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.”

OZYPOV

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