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Because how often do you get to brag that you picked up your über-cute high-waisted shorts from the back of a truck?

Food trucks are so 2010. Instead of bulgogi tacos and lobster rolls, fashion trucks are serving up delectable styles to satisfy every palate, from bohemian to haute couture. In the U.S., roughly 300 mobile boutiques have taken their wares to the road.

Last week, OZY hit the streets of style mecca Los Angeles for a sneak peek into Selvedge Dry Goods Boutique, which sells vintage and reconstructed clothing and accessories. Owner Monique Cruz opened Selvedge Dry Goods after working for years as a kid’s clothing designer and buyer. “I encountered many ethical issues I didn’t feel comfortable supporting,” she said.

So in 2012, she transformed an abandoned, beat-up truck into the sustainable boutique of her dreams. Not only does she save on the overhead and rent of a brick-and-mortar store, her customers get to brag that they snagged their cute outfit — from a truck.

But, there are still troubles with going mobile. For example, L.A. won’t issue permits allowing trucks to sell goods on public streets. So Cruz often parks at events on private property, like college campuses and flea markets.

We caught up with Cruz at Echo Park, outside downtown L.A. As she took us on a tour of her Tiffany blue truck, she fingered the pleated skirts, lace and beadwork on dresses hanging from rows of old pipes-turned-clothing racks. “You just don’t see this type of detail anymore,” she said. She chooses most of her items based on current trends but sometimes alters them herself, cutting high-waisted jeans into shorts and adding fringe to Morrissey and Guns ‘n’ Roses tees.

Watch as we learn more about how Cruz converted a clunker into a boutique, this summer’s hottest style trends and why Echo Park is the new Brooklyn.

Top Image Source: Getty

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Melissa Pandika

Melissa Pandika

Ozy Author

Melissa Pandika is a lab rat-turned-journalist with an eye to all things science, medicine and more. Likes distance running, snails, late-night Korean BBQ + R&B slow jams.